• Why does Windows 7 and Windows Vista display a dialog box when a Bluetooth audio device is initially connected
  • How do I enhance the functionality and better represent my Bluetooth device in Devices and Printers
  • Windows Hardware Certification Program
  • Does Windows 8 have new Bluetooth requirements
  • Appendix A: How to Install an In-Box Bluetooth Driver on New Hardware in Windows Vista
  • Step 1: Start Device Manager and Select the Bluetooth Radio
  • Step 2: Start the Update Driver Software Wizard
  • Step 3: Select the Generic Bluetooth Driver
  • Appendix B: An Example of a Vendor-Provided INF File for Use in Windows Vista
  • Can vendors add tabs to the Control Panel Bluetooth Settings application?




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    Can vendors add tabs to the Control Panel Bluetooth Settings application?


    Yes, vendors can add tabs by implementing a shell property sheet handler for the application. For example, IHVs that implement extensions to the in-box Bluetooth stack can implement a property sheet handler that adds tabs for profiles such as file transfer, enhancements added to version 2.1 of the Bluetooth specification, and so on. For more information about how to implement property sheet handlers, see “Creating Property Sheet Handlers” on the MSDN Web site.

    Why does Windows 7 and Windows Vista display a dialog box when a Bluetooth audio device is initially connected?


    Windows might not provide default support for headset (HSP), hands-free (HFP), or advanced audio distribution (A2DP) audio profiles. If a Bluetooth audio device is paired with a system that does not have the necessary drivers, Windows typically displays the Found New Hardware dialog box. However, the dialog box does not appear if one of the following is true:

    • The computer’s OEM provided a profile pack that supports Bluetooth audio.

    • The end user previously installed a Bluetooth headset and downloaded the audio drivers from media that the IHV or Windows Update provided.



    How do I enhance the functionality and better represent my Bluetooth device in Devices and Printers?


    You can create a device metadata package for your Bluetooth device so that Devices and Printers displays device-specific information about your device, such as photorealistic icons and custom descriptions. This can significantly improve a user’s experience with your Bluetooth device. For example, you might want to more effectively expose all the features that your device supports. Certain device classes can also take advantage of Device Stage, which enables IHVs to further enhance the device experience by providing a customized and branded device-specific user interface.

    For more information about how to create a device metadata package for your device, see “How to Create a Device Metadata Package for Devices and Printers” on the WHDC Web site.

    For more information about Device Stage, see “Device Stage General Development Kit” on the MSDN Web site.

    Note: To take advantage of Device Stage, the Device ID Profile must be implemented, which includes the Hardware ID, Vendor ID, and PID.

    Windows Hardware Certification Program

    Where are the Windows Hardware Certification Program requirements for Bluetooth wireless technology?


    The Windows Hardware Certification Program specifies the requirements for hardware and software to work optimally with Windows. For specific details about the Windows Hardware Certification Program requirements for Bluetooth radios and devices, see Windows 8 Hardware Certification Requirements and Policies.

    For general information about the Windows Hardware Certification Program, see Windows Hardware Certification.


    Does Windows 8 have new Bluetooth requirements?


    For Windows 8, the Windows Hardware Certification Program requires Bluetooth radios to support Bluetooth version 4.0 to qualify for a Windows logo. Updated tests are included in the latest version of the WLK. For more information about where to download the WLK, see Windows 8 Hardware Certification Requirements and Policies.

    Resources

    MSDN


    Bluetooth

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa362932(VS.85).aspx



    Bluetooth Functions

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa362927(VS.85).aspx



    Bluetooth Device Driver Reference

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/ff536768(v=vs.85).aspx



    Windows Hardware Certification Program

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg463010.aspx



    Creating Property Sheet Handlers

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb776850(VS.85).aspx



    Windows 7 Device Stage General Development Kit

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff547564.aspx



    Installing Private Builds of In-box Drivers (Windows Vista and Later)

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff547644.aspx



    How to Create a Device Metadata Package for Devices and Printers

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg463145.aspx



    How to Get the WDK

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/hardware/gg487428



    Microsoft OS Descriptors

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg463179.aspx



    Windows 7 Logo Kit

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg487530.aspx



    Windows Logo Program Requirements and Policies

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg487403.aspx



    Wireless Technologies

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg487357.aspx


    Microsoft Download


    Step-by-Step Guide to Controlling Device Installation and Usage with Group Policy

    http://download.microsoft.com/download/3/b/a/3ba6d659-6e39-4cd7-b3a2-9c96482f5353/Step%20by%20Step%20Guide%20to%20Controlling%20Device%20Installation%20and%20Usage%20with%20Group%20Policy.doc


    Organization


    Bluetooth Special Interest Group

    http://www.bluetooth.org



    Appendix A: How to Install an In-Box Bluetooth Driver on New Hardware in Windows Vista


    This appendix describes the procedure for forcing the Bluetooth driver that is included with Windows Vista to install on a new Bluetooth radio. Windows XP SP2 uses a similar procedure, although some of the details are different.

    Step 1: Start Device Manager and Select the Bluetooth Radio


    To start Device Manager:

    1. Click Start, navigate to All Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator to open a command window with elevated privileges.



    2. Type the following:
    Devmgmt.msc
    Under Other Devices, find the entry for the Bluetooth radio on the Device Manager list of devices. In Figure A-1, the radio’s name is ”UGT”. On some portable computers, you might be required to first turn on the Bluetooth radio by using a key combination such as Fn+F5.

    Screenshot of the Device Manager dialog box

    Figure A-1. Device Manager

    To verify that the selected device is a Bluetooth radio, right-click the device name and then click Properties to display the Properties dialog box. On the Details tab, verify that the device has the compatible ID for a Bluetooth radio:


    USB\Class_e0&SubClass_01&Prot_01

    Step 2: Start the Update Driver Software Wizard


    Right-click the Bluetooth radio node and then click Update Driver Software. To go to the page in Figure A‑2, click Browse my computer for driver software. To manually select a driver, click Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer.

    Screenshot of the Update Driver Software dialog box

    Figure A-2. Update Driver Software Wizard: Manually Install a Driver

    Step 3: Select the Generic Bluetooth Driver


    The Update Driver Software Wizard next displays a list of available drivers. Select Bluetooth Radios and then select a Bluetooth radio that matches your system, as shown in Figure A-3. If you are not sure which driver to use, you can use the generic driver for testing. To do this, select Generic Adapter as manufacturer and Generic Bluetooth Adapter as the model.

    Screenshot of the Update Driver SOftware dialog box, telling you to Select the device Driver you want to install for this hardware

    Figure A-3. Update Driver Software Wizard: Select Generic Bluetooth Driver

    After you select a driver, the wizard asks you to confirm that you want to install the specified driver on the new Bluetooth radio. If you try to install a Bluetooth driver on a device that is not a Bluetooth radio, the driver will probably not start.



    If the driver loads correctly, Device Manager should have a Generic Bluetooth Adapter entry under the Bluetooth Radios node, as shown in Figure A-4.

    Screenshot of Device Manager, showing the Generic Bluetooth Adapter selected under Bluetooth Radios

    Figure A-4. Device Manager: The Newly Installed Driver

    If the driver failed to start, for example, if Windows returned a start error code, examine the event log to help determine the cause.


    Appendix B: An Example of a Vendor-Provided INF File for Use in Windows Vista


    This appendix includes an example of how to implement a vendor-provided INF file that references Bth.inf. This particular example is implemented to install a radio that is compatible with version 2.0 plus EDR of the Bluetooth specification in Windows XP or Windows Vista. The INF files for other types of Bluetooth devices are similar. This INF file can be used to install the device on the following versions of Windows:

    • All SKUs of the 32-bit version of Windows XP SP2 and later service packs.

    • All SKUs of the 64-bit version of Windows XP.

    • All SKUs of Windows Vista.


    Note: This INF file cannot be used with Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003, or any versions of Windows XP that have not been upgraded to at least SP2. Also, a vendor-provided INF file is not necessary for Windows 7 because any USB device that has a USB\Class_E0&SubClass_01&Prot_01 hardware ID will install as a Generic Bluetooth Adapter in Windows 7.

    For an explanation of the highlighted sections and directives, see the numbered notes after the following sample:

    ; XYZ Vendor INF File for Bluetooth Radio

    ;

    ; A sample INF for a stand-alone Bluetooth radio that does not



    ; have native Windows Vista support
    ; [1]

    [Version]

    Signature = "$Windows NT$"

    Provider = %ProviderName%

    Class = Bluetooth

    CLASSGUID = {e0cbf06c-cd8b-4647-bb8a-263b43f0f974};

    DriverVer = 10/28/2006,6.0.0.0 ;

    CatalogFile.NT = BTHXYZ1.CAB


    [ControlFlags]

    ExcludeFromSelect=*


    [SourceDisksNames]

    1=%SourceDisk%,,1


    [Manufacturer]

    %ManufacturerName% = XYZBth,NT.5.1,NTx86,NTamd64


    ; Match on a hardware ID generated by the device, for x86 and x64.
    ; [2]

    [ZYXBth.NT.5.1]

    %BthRadio1% = Bt1.NT.5.1, USB\VID_xxxx&PID_yyyy

    [ZYXBth.NTx86]

    % BthRadio1% = Bt1.NT.5.1, USB\VID_xxxx&PID_yyyy

    [ZYXBth.NTamd64]

    % BthRadio1% = Bt1.NT.5.1, USB\VID_xxxx&PID_yyyy
    ; Windows XP specific sections -------------------------
    ; [3]

    [Bt1.NT.5.1]



    include = bth.inf

    needs = BthUsb.NT
    [Bt1.NT.5.1.HW]

    include = bth.inf

    needs = BthUsb.NT.HW

    DelReg = DeleteRegKeys
    [Bt1.NT.5.1.Services]

    include = bth.inf

    needs = BthUsb.NT.Services
    ; [4]

    [DeleteRegKeys]

    ; Delete support for the Microsoft FaxService

    HKLM,"SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Bthport\Parameters\UnsupportedServices","{00001111-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb}"


    [Strings]

    ; While strings are localizable, in this sample INF, we have

    ; not created any localized strings.

    ProviderName = "Vendor XYZ (c)"

    ManufacturerName = "Vendor XYZ (c)"

    BthRadio1 = "Bluetooth 2.0+EDR Model 3.2 from XYZ (c)"

    SourceDisk = "Windows Vista CD"

    Notes:

    1. The Version section should have the CLASSGUID and DriverVer directives set as follows:



    CLASSGUID. Use the Microsoft class GUID for Bluetooth devices ({e0cbf06c‑cd8b-4647-bb8a-263b43f0f974}), not a third-party GUID.

    DriverVer: If you want to supersede the default in-box driver, the driver version must be set to provide a higher ranking match than what is in Bth.inf. For more information about configuring a driver to supersede the default in‑box driver, see “Installing Private Builds of In-Box Drivers (Windows Vista and Later)” on the MSDN Web site.

    2. Hardware IDs. The combination of the VID and the PID must be unique to the manufacturer and device. This ensures that the same hardware ID does not correspond to multiple devices.

    3. Include and Needs directives. The Include directives in these three sections reference Bth.inf. The Needs directives indicate which sections from Bth.inf should be processed during device installation.



    4. The DelReg directive, which references the DeleteRegKeys section, deletes registry keys or values that prevent Windows from creating a PDO or devnode for a device. For example, the fax service profile is currently on the Windows Vista list of unsupported services, so it is a value of the UnsupportedServices registry key. This example deletes the fax services profile from the UnsupportedServices key, which lets Windows create a devnode for the device.

    We strongly recommend that you run the latest WHQL tests on the device and INF file and publish the INF file package on Windows Update. This ensures that customers can automatically download the INF file from the Internet when they connect their new Bluetooth radio to their computer.

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    Can vendors add tabs to the Control Panel Bluetooth Settings application?

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