• 2. Choosing the Best Multilingual Solutions
  • Mostly a language other than English.
  • English Version of Windows XP Professional
  • Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack
  • Helping administrators to define a single corporate standard for desktops worldwide.
  • Enabling administrators to apply Service Packs or updates once for all supported language environments.
  • Allowing workstations to be shared by users who speak different languages.
  • Letting users log on anywhere and get the user interface in their own language.
  • Windows XP Professional Localized Versions
  • 3. Overview of Multilingual Solutions in Global Business
  • 4. Whats New for Multilingual Features
  • Complex Script Collection.
  • Improved Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack
  • Redesigned Regional and Language Options Control Panel
  • New, Simplified Terminology
  • Additional Answer File and Unattended Mode Setup
  • New Multilingual Troubleshooter
  • 5: Using Multilingual Features in Office XP and Windows XP Professional
  • Office XP with Multilingual User Interface Pack
  • 6. Summary Related Links Summary
  • Multilingual Features in Windows xp professional Introduction




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    Multilingual Features in Windows XP Professional

    1. Introduction
    In the global economy, increasing numbers of companies need to have their computing systems support multiple languages. The Microsoft Windows XP Professional operating system eases the complexity of computing in a multilingual environment by providing different versions and options designed to make it easier and less costly to get work done—for all your users regardless of their location or language.

    Windows XP Professional will be available in 24 official localized versions in addition to English (for a complete list, see Appendix A). In any version of Windows XP Professional, you can display, input, edit, and print documents in hundreds of languages. Users or administrators can set regional preferences, fonts, keyboard layouts, sorting orders, date formats, and so on.

    The biggest innovation for multilingual computing is the Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack, which is an add–on to the English version of Windows XP Professional. It lets users or administrators switch the User Interface (menus, dialogs and help files) from one language to another. This feature greatly eases desktop administration in multilingual computing environments, and lowers cost of desktop change and configuration management considerably. The Multilingual User Interface Pack will be available in 33 languages (for a complete list, see Appendix B).

    This article introduces multilingual computing in Windows XP Professional and is designed to help IT managers choose the right multilingual options for their organization. It includes a section on how you can use multilingual features in Office XP for a more tightly integrated multilingual environment.



    2. Choosing the Best Multilingual Solutions
    Choosing a strategy for multilingual computing doesn’t have to be complicated. IT managers should begin evaluating their current environment by assessing how their organization fits into the following three scenarios:

    If your company uses:



    • Mostly English. Consider obtaining the English version of Windows XP Professional with its support for viewing, editing and printing documents in hundreds of languages.

    • Mostly a language other than English. Consider obtaining the appropriate localized version of Windows XP Professional. For example, if your organization only uses French, the localized French version of Windows XP Professional is the appropriate choice.

    • A combination of multiple languages. Consider obtaining the English version of Windows XP Professional with Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack to support the languages you need.

    English Version of Windows XP Professional

    This version is suitable for companies whose users are fluent in English but occasionally need to work with documents, Web pages, or e–mail in other languages.

    For example, an American-based company with a Japanese subsidiary may wish to maintain an intranet site for its employees in both English and Japanese. The webmasters and the editors would be able to create and edit both the English and Japanese web pages using the English version of Windows XP Professional (the user interface of their machines, however, would remain in English). Employees browsing the intranet site would be able to display the pages regardless which version of Windows XP they are running.

    Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack

    This is an add-on to the English version of Windows XP Professional and is available only via volume licensing programs to corporate users. (For more information about volume licensing, see the Microsoft Licensing Web site.



    The Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack lets administrators or users specify the language of the user interface to any of the 33 supported languages. The Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack eases the deployment and maintenance of multilingual computing environments by:

    • Helping administrators to define a single corporate standard for desktops worldwide. The Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack makes it easier and more efficient to centrally define, create and maintain a well manage desktop configurations including desktop productivity tools and business applications and then deploy it with the appropriate language interface to give the users an excellent localized experience. For example, a United States-based corporation with subsidiary offices in Tokyo, Athens, and Rome can now deploy the Windows XP English version with Multilingual User Interface Pack in each office, rather than the Windows XP Japanese version in Tokyo, the Windows XP Greek version in Athens and the Windows XP Italian version in Rome.

    • Enabling administrators to apply Service Packs or updates once for all supported language environments. Because the Multilingual User Interface Pack is installed on top of the English version of Windows XP, applying a Service Pack or update is greatly simplified for a global organization. Rather than waiting for and then applying, tracking, and maintaining a different service pack, tool, and application set for each localized version, administrators can apply the same software to every machine in the company, regardless of location. The result: significantly lower costs for maintaining a global desktop computing environment.

    • Allowing workstations to be shared by users who speak different languages. This eliminates the need for dual–boot configurations or dedicated machines for each language, resulting in lower cost. In addition, it helps workers be more productive by providing them with a system environment in their native language.

    • Letting users log on anywhere and get the user interface in their own language. In Windows XP, users' language settings are stored in their user profile, allowing the settings to travel with them when they roam among different computers in a network. This enables a user to move from one Windows XP–based machine to another and retain the same multilingual and international settings. In addition, with the Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack, the user interface language is also stored in the user profile, enabling users to move between networked machines running Windows XP English version with Multilingual User Interface Pack and retain a consistent UI language. For example, a sales representative based in Zurich, Switzerland could maintain a German UI language when working on machines in both the Geneva and Zurich offices, rather than having to use a French user interface in the Geneva office.

    For a list of all 33 languages supported in the Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack, see Appendix B).

    Windows XP Professional Localized Versions

    If your organization operates in a single language other than English, you can deploy one of 24 different localized versions of Windows XP Professional. For example, if you are responsible for computing in a company that operates only in French, you would get the French version of Windows XP Professional. Your users would still have support to view, edit, and print in hundreds languages, but the interface would only be available in French. For a list of the 24 localized versions, see Appendix A).



    3. Overview of Multilingual Solutions in Global Business

    Windows XP Professional supports companies that do international business and need to allow users (employees or customers) to work in more than one language. Typically, these companies:



    • Operate internationally and must support different regional settings, such as time zones, currencies, or date formats.

    • Have employees or customers who speak different languages or require language–dependent keyboards or input devices.

    • Develop internal line–of–business applications that must run internationally or in more than one language.

    Table 1 below provides outlines of how Windows XP Professional solves common problems faced by international or multilingual (multinational) companies.

    Table 1 Solving Multilingual Issues for Global Businesses

    Problem

    Solution

    Users need to edit documents that contain multiple languages

    All versions of Windows XP Professional contain support for editing documents in multiple languages.

    Users need language–specific keyboards, Input Method Editors, or alternative input devices.

    Windows XP Professional contains built–in support for a variety of keyboard layouts and input methods and devices. Users or administrators can install additional Language Collections and Input Languages as needed and place the On-Screen Keyboard on desktops where the physical keyboard might not match the operating system language version in use.

    Regional offices need automatic operating system deployments with the correct language and regional settings, such as the default input language the date, time, and currency formats.

    Administrators can determine each office's language and regional needs to help reduce the number of unique setup scripts. For each unique setup script, administrators can specify the appropriate values use new keywords in Windows XP to set the default values for standards, formats and input language/keyboard layout combinations allowing for greater flexibility. If the user interface needs to be in local language, administrators can deploy the Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack on top of the English version of Windows XP.

    Roaming users need to log on anywhere in their native languages.

    Administrators can use the Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack for desktops if roaming users must log on in a native language. Multilingual user interface support for applications is further enhanced with the use of Office XP Multilingual User Interface Pack. For more information, see Using Multilingual Features in Office XP and Windows XP Professional below.

    Multiple users need to log on to the same computer in different languages.

    Administrators can use the Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack for desktops if roaming users must log on in a native language, eliminating the need for dual-boot configurations or dedicated machines. Multilingual support for applications is further enhanced with the use of the Office XP Multilingual User Interface Pack

    Existing line–of–business applications must accommodate language and regional differences.

    Administrators can ensure proper code page support for applications developed under older operating systems. And they can test applications by changing the language for non–Unicode programs and default input languages.

    Application developers want to create single code–based applications that run in the correct local language.

    Administrators can deploy the English version of Windows XP Professional with the Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack as the desktop standard. Developers can build applications in Unicode that support the multilingual user interface. And they can write applications that check for the default user interface language and follow world–ready software development guidelines. For more information, see Microsoft Global Software Development.

    Sites on the corporate intranet must account for language and regional differences

    Administrators can use the location setting to configure desktop browsers to receive appropriate local content, such as local weather or news.

    IT wants to do simultaneous worldwide rollouts of hot fixes, patches, and Service Packs.

    Companies can deploy the English version of Windows XP Professional with Multilingual User Interface Pack as the global desktop standard.

    Users need to share folders or files containing text in other languages.

    Administrators can ensure that only Unicode characters are used for the Active Directory™ service and other folder and file names. Users or administrators can install Complex Script and Right–to–Left or East Asian language collections as needed.



    4. What's New for Multilingual Features
    Windows XP Professional includes improvements that enhance your company's ability to do business in multiple languages or regions:

    Support for 135 Locales

    A locale is a collection of Windows XP Professional settings that reflects a specific country or region’s language and cultural conventions. For example, the English (Canadian), English (United Kingdom), and English (United States) locales reflect different countries/regions that share a common language but use different dialects, currencies, and so on.

    Versions of Microsoft Windows earlier than Windows XP Professional support up to 126 locales. Windows XP Professional adds support for nine additional locales: Galician, Gujarati, Kannada, Kyrgyz, Mongolian (Cyrillic), Punjabi, Divehi, Syriac, and Telugu. For a complete list of supported locales, see Appendix C).

    Language Collections

    Any language version of Windows XP Professional provides built–in support for editing documents in many languages, found in one of three Language Collections:



    • Basic Collection. This is always installed and includes most languages spoken in Western and Central Europe, and the United States, plus support for Baltic, Greek, Cyrillic, and Turkic languages.

    • Complex Script Collection. This is optionally installed depending on the operating system language version and includes complex script and right–to–left languages such as Thai, Hebrew, Arabic, Vietnamese, Indic, Georgian and Armenian.

    • East Asian Collection. This is always installed on the Asian versions of Windows XP Professional and optionally installed on all other versions and includes Japanese, Korean, and Simplified and Traditional Chinese.

    Improved Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack

    The Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack ensures that most of the operating system user interface — including the Start and Programs menus, alerts and dialog boxes, and the Windows XP Professional Help and Support Center — appears in the user’s selected language.

    The Multilingual User Interface Pack runs on top of and requires the English Version of Windows XP Professional. Compared to the Windows 2000 release of the Multilingual User Interface Pack, the Windows XP release includes more localized components. Compared to a localized version of Windows XP Professional, the following parts of the operating system are not localized in the Multilingual Interface User Pack:


    • 16–bit code

    • Part of the registry keys and values

    • ANSI components

    • INF files

    The Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack also makes roaming easier and simplifies remote administration over a corporate network.

    Redesigned Regional and Language Options Control Panel

    The Control Panel for Regional and Language Options has been redesigned to make it easier to add and change input languages and keyboard layouts, switch standards and formats for displaying dates, amounts, and currencies, set your location for receiving local services such as news and weather over the Web. The most frequently used options are now easier to find and use.




    
    










    Figure 1 Adjusting Regional and Language Options.

    New, Simplified Terminology

    The terminology used in versions of Windows earlier than Windows XP Professional has been updated to simpler, more descriptive terms:



    • Standards and Formats, which determines the formats used to display dates, times, currency, numbers, and the sorting order of text, was previously called the User Locale.

    • Input Language, which specifies the combination of the language and keyboard layout used to enter text, was previously called the Input Locale.

    • Language for Non–Unicode Programs, which specifies the default code pages and fonts for running non-Unicode programs, was previously called the System Locale.

    Additional Answer File and Unattended Mode Setup

    Windows XP Professional includes four new language keys that you can use in the [RegionalSettings] section of answer files. These keys make it easier for administrators to customize language settings, such as the default input language for new user accounts. Other features provide more options for customizing unattended mode setups and silent configurations after setup.



    New Multilingual Troubleshooter

    The Multilingual Document Consultant in Windows XP Professional Help and Support Center can assist you in diagnosing and resolving problems you might encounter while creating, editing, or viewing documents containing multiple languages. As shown in Figure 2 below, this tool walks you through troubleshooting common multilingual issues.




    
    










    Figure 2 Using the Multilingual Document Consultant.


    5: Using Multilingual Features in Office XP and Windows XP Professional
    Like Windows XP Professional, the English version of Office XP is built on an international core, meaning that it combines support for different languages into a single product that you can run worldwide. Also like Windows XP Professional, Office XP is available in English and other language versions, and with the Multilingual User Interface Pack.

    When you install Office XP on a computer running the English or a localized version of Windows XP Professional, Office XP detects and uses the same default input language that the Windows XP Professional operating system uses. Office XP also enables support for scripts available in the Windows XP Professional operating system configuration.



    Office XP with Multilingual User Interface Pack

    The Office XP Multilingual User Interface Pack adds key multilingual capabilities to those already built into Office by providing localized text for the user interface, online Help, wizards, and templates for Office programs.

    If your company uses many languages, deploys Office XP worldwide from a central IT group, or needs to support workstations shared by different language speakers, use the Office XP Multilingual User Interface Pack. Windows XP Professional is the most appropriate operating system that supports all of the Office XP Multilingual User Interface Pack features.

    When you install the Office XP Multilingual User Interface Pack on a computer running Windows XP Professional Multilingual User Interface Pack, Office XP detects the default user interface language of Windows XP Professional and sets that as the default for all Office programs. For example, if you install the Office XP Multilingual User Interface Pack on a computer running Windows XP Professional Multilingual User Interface Pack, and the default user interface language of that computer is set to Spanish, Office XP will also use Spanish as the default user interface language for Office XP applications.

    For more information about using multilingual capabilities in Office XP, see Office XP Resource Kit: Planning an International Deployment.
    6. Summary & Related Links
    Summary

    Windows XP will be available in 24 localized in addition to English. In any of the language versions, you can display, input, edit, and print documents in hundreds of languages. Users or administrators can set regional preferences, fonts, keyboard layouts, sorting orders, date formats, and so on.

    The biggest innovation for multilingual computing is the Windows XP Multilingual User Interface Pack, which is an add–on to the English version of Windows XP. It lets users or administrators switch the User Interface (menus, dialogs and help files) from one language to another. This feature greatly eases desktop administration in multilingual computing environments, and lowers cost of desktop change and configuration management considerably.

    The Office XP Multilingual User Interface Pack adds an even more tightly integrated multilingual experience for users with localized user interface, online Help, wizards, and templates for Office programs.




    For More Information

    See the following Web sites for further information about multilingual computing:



    • Microsoft Global Software Development

    • Deploying Office with the Multilingual User Interface Pack

    • Platform SDK: Multilanguage User Interface

    • Microsoft Licensing

    To find Microsoft Web sites for specific countries, see:

    • Microsoft Worldwide Sites


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