• Synthetic Network Adapter
  • Install Multiple Synthetic Network Adapters on Multiprocessor VMs
  • Offload Hardware
  • Network Switch Topology
  • Interrupt Affinity
  • VM Chimney
  • Performance Tuning for File Server Workload (NetBench)
  • Performance Tuning Guidelines for Windows Server 2008 R2 April 12, 2013 Abstract




    Download 0.5 Mb.
    bet20/24
    Sana21.03.2017
    Hajmi0.5 Mb.
    1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24

    Network I/O Performance


    Hyper-V supports synthetic and emulated network adapters in the VMs, but the synthetic devices offer significantly better performance and reduced CPU overhead. Each of these adapters is connected to a virtual network switch, which can be connected to a physical network adapter if external network connectivity is needed.

    For how to tune the network adapter in the root partition, including interrupt moderation, refer to “Performance Tuning for the Networking Subsystem” earlier in this guide. The TCP tunings in that section should be applied, if required, to the child partitions.


    Synthetic Network Adapter


    Hyper-V features a synthetic network adapter that is designed specifically for VMs to achieve significantly reduced CPU overhead on network I/O when it is compared to the emulated network adapter that mimics existing hardware. The synthetic network adapter communicates between the child and root partitions over VMBus by using shared memory for more efficient data transfer.

    The emulated network adapter should be removed through the VM settings dialog box and replaced with a synthetic network adapter. The guest requires that the VM integration services be installed.

    Perfmon counters representing the network statistics for the installed synthetic network adapters are available under the counter set \Hyper-V Virtual Network Adapter (*) \ *.

    Install Multiple Synthetic Network Adapters on Multiprocessor VMs


    Virtual machines with more than one virtual processor might benefit from having more than one synthetic network adaptor installed into the VM. Workloads that are network intensive, such as a Web server, can make use of greater parallelism in the virtual network stack if a second synthetic NIC is installed into a VM.

    Offload Hardware


    As with the native scenario, offload capabilities in the physical network adapter reduce the CPU usage of network I/Os in VM scenarios. Hyper-V currently uses LSOv1 and TCPv4 checksum offload. The offload capabilities must be enabled in the driver for the physical network adapter in the root partition. For details on offload capabilities in network adapters, refer to “Choosing a Network Adapter” earlier in this guide.

    Drivers for certain network adapters disable LSOv1 but enable LSOv2 by default. System administrators must explicitly enable LSOv1 by using the driver Properties dialog box in Device Manager.


    Network Switch Topology


    Hyper-V supports creating multiple virtual network switches, each of which can be attached to a physical network adapter if needed. Each network adapter in a VM can be connected to a virtual network switch. If the physical server has multiple network adapters, VMs with network-intensive loads can benefit from being connected to different virtual switches to better use the physical network adapters.

    Perfmon counters representing the network statistics for the installed synthetic switches are available under the counter set \Hyper-V Virtual Switch (*) \ *.


    Interrupt Affinity


    System administrators can use the IntPolicy tool to bind device interrupts to specific processors.

    VLAN Performance


    The Hyper-V synthetic network adapter supports VLAN tagging. It provides significantly better network performance if the physical network adapter supports NDIS_ENCAPSULATION_IEEE_802_3_P_AND_Q_IN_OOB encapsulation for both large send and checksum offload. Without this support, Hyper-V cannot use hardware offload for packets that require VLAN tagging and network performance can be decreased.

    VMQ


    Windows Server 2008 R2 introduces support for VMQ-enabled network adapters. These adapters can maintain a separate hardware queue for each VM, up to the limit supported by each network adapter.

    As there are limited hardware queues available, you can use the Hyper-V WMI API to ensure that the VMs that are using the network bandwidth are assigned a hardware queue.


    VM Chimney


    Windows Server 2008 R2 introduces support for VM Chimney. Network connections with long lifetimes will see the most benefit due to the increase in CPU required for connection establishment when VM Chimney is enabled.

    Live Migration


    Live migration allows you to transparently move running virtual machines from one node of the failover cluster to another node in the same cluster without a dropped network connection or perceived downtime. In addition, failover clustering requires shared storage for the cluster nodes.

    The process of moving a running virtual machine can be broken down in to two major phases. The first phase is the copying of the memory contents on the VM from the current host to the new host. The second phase is the transfer of the VM state from the current host to the new host. The durations of both phases is greatly determined by the speed at which data can be transferred from the current host to the new host.

    Providing a dedicated network for Live Migration traffic helps to minimize the time required to complete a Live Migration and it ensures consistent migration times.



    Figure 8. Example Hyper-V Live Migration Configuration

    In addition, increasing the number of receive and send buffers on each network adapter involved in the migration can improve migration performance. For more information, see “Performance Tuning for the Networking Subsystem” earlier in this guide.


    Performance Tuning for File Server Workload (NetBench)


    NetBench 7.02 is an eTesting Labs workload that measures the performance of file servers as they handle network file requests from clients. NetBench gives you an overall I/O throughput score and average response time for your server and with individual scores for the client computers. You can use these scores to measure, analyze, and predict how well your server can handle file requests from clients.

    To make sure of a fresh start, the data volumes should always be formatted between tests to flush and clean up the working set. For improved performance and scalability, we recommend that client data be partitioned over multiple data volumes. The networking, storage, and interrupt affinity sections contain additional tuning information that might apply to specific hardware.


    1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24


    Download 0.5 Mb.

    Bosh sahifa
    Aloqalar

        Bosh sahifa


    Performance Tuning Guidelines for Windows Server 2008 R2 April 12, 2013 Abstract

    Download 0.5 Mb.