• Explore the use of Intranet communication technologies to enhance learning Compare the effectiveness of different communication technologies.
  • Tutors could contribute to discussions and answer questions.
  • Post-trial interviews were conducted. Results
  • considered very useful by students Why
  • Groups need to be much bigger to make participation worthwhile. The immediacy offered by chat was considered valuable.
  • Some viewed chat as an alternative to a seminar, with privileged tutor access, rather than as a way to discuss problems with a peer.
  • Students in one group commented on the need to know who other group members are, both to put a name to a face and continue discussions offline.
  • One student commented on the need for students questions to be phrased clearly, rather than being vague statements of problems.
  • It needs to ‘fit in’ with the ways that students work. It must be accessible from the places they choose to work.
  • Electronic communication does not facilitate the negotiation of meanings to reach a common understanding.
  • Supporting a large-class programming course with Intranet tools




    Download 23.85 Kb.
    Sana01.04.2020
    Hajmi23.85 Kb.

    Supporting a large-class programming course with Intranet tools
    Paul Curzon, Ann Blandford,

    Matt Jones, Gary Marsden

    and Matt Smith
    School of Computer Science,

    Middlesex University

    Email: P.Curzon@mdx.ac.uk

    Aims





    • Compare the effectiveness of different communication technologies.




    • Investigate the attitudes of students to the use of these technologies.




    • The study was based on a programming course characterised by

    • large-class size

    • 200+ students,

    • low staff/student ratio, and

    • students with mixed ability and background

    • HND, BSc and students studying for non-computing degrees.


    Method


    • 25 paid volunteers




    • split into 5, 5-member, mixed ability groups




    • given access to different communication technologies

    • structured email;

    • newsgroups;

    • live ‘talk’ discussion

    • all of above

    • none of above (control)




    • Tutors could contribute to discussions and answer questions.







    • Students completed online attitude questionnaires.




    • Post-trial interviews were conducted.


    Results

    • Most students expressed the strong belief that the facilities could be extremely beneficial in appropriate conditions.



    • However, minimal use was made of any of the communication technologies.



    • Great use was made of the online questionnaires

     considered very useful by students
    Why?


    • Network limitations (speed, reliability, accessibility from outside the University) and other usability difficulties were seriously detrimental to activity.




    • Groups need to be much bigger to make participation worthwhile.




    • The immediacy offered by chat was considered valuable.

    • Students want to discuss their problems with someone now, not post a query and wait 24 hours for a reply.

    • Some viewed chat as an alternative to a seminar, with privileged tutor access, rather than as a way to discuss problems with a peer.




    • One student proposed that there should be private “student only” chat groups where they could discuss things without the presence of a lecturer.




    • Students in one group commented on the need to know who other group members are, both to put a name to a face and continue discussions offline.

    • The medium is seen as a complement to their other means of interaction.




    • One student commented on the need for students' questions to be phrased clearly, rather than being vague statements of problems.





    Conclusions



    • Technological support needs to be useful and usable.




    • It needs to ‘fit in’ with the ways that students work.




    • It must be accessible from the places they choose to work.




    • It must complement other ways of interacting with tutors and peers

    • not represent an 'alternative reality'.




    • Electronic communication does not facilitate the negotiation of meanings to reach a common understanding.




    • There are real limits to its usefulness in helping people grapple with poorly understood difficulties that they cannot articulate clearly.

    Download 23.85 Kb.




    Download 23.85 Kb.

    Bosh sahifa
    Aloqalar

        Bosh sahifa



    Supporting a large-class programming course with Intranet tools

    Download 23.85 Kb.