• Cluster Resource: Enhanced Private Properties
  • Windows NT 4.0
  • Chkdsk Status Codes in the Cluster Log
  • Differences in Windows NT 4.0
  • Differences in Windows 2000 Versions Earlier than SP1
  • Differences in Windows 2000 Advanced Server SP1 and Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
  • Windows 2000 Chkdsk Management




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    If Handles Remain Open, or If the Cluster Contains a Single Shared Drive


    If programs or drivers maintain an open handle to the shared drive, or if there is only a single shared drive (on which the quorum log is stored), Chkdsk may not be able to get an exclusive lock to the drives. To resolve this issue, have Chkdsk run automatically when the drive is brought online by setting the dirty bit on the drive. To get Chkdsk to run when the system fails over, follow these steps:

    1. Quit all programs, stop all cluster-unaware applications, and log on to the server with an account that has Administrative rights.

    2. Start Cluster Administrator, right-click the cluster name, and then click Properties.

    3. Click the Quorum tab, and then note which drive is the quorum disk. If the drive on which you want to run Chkdsk contains the quorum log, temporarily move the quorum disk to another shared drive.

    4. Copy FSUtil.exe from the %SystemRoot%\System32 folder on a Windows XP–or-later-based computer to the local drive on the Windows 2000–based computer.

    5. On the Windows 2000–based computer, at a command prompt, change to the folder that contains FSUtil.exe, and then type the following command, where drive is the shared drive:

    fsutil dirty set drive:

    1. Use Cluster Administrator to find the group that contains the shared drive on which you want to run Chkdsk.

    2. Right-click the group name, and then click Take Offline. This takes the whole group offline, including the shared drive, and closes all the handles to the physical drive.

    3. Right-click the Physical Disk resource, and then click Bring Online.

    This brings the drive online. Chkdsk will be run against the volume, and it may appear in an Online Pending state for awhile.

    1. After Chkdsk runs on the volume, bring all other resources in the group online.

    Cluster Resource: Enhanced Private Properties


    The Cluster service in Windows 2000 includes enhanced disk resource private properties. Some of these enhancements provide you better control over when Chkdsk is run against a shared drive.

    When you run a command to display the private properties of the Physical Disk resource type named “Disk Q:” in Cluster Administrator, the output in Windows NT 4.0 is different from Windows 2000. The command is:



    cluster clustername res “Disk Q:” /priv

    The output is as follows:


    Windows NT 4.0


    Private properties for Physical Disk Resource 'Disk Q:':

    R Name Value

    - -------------------------------- -----------------------

    Signature 1415371731 (0x545cdbd3)

    DiskInfo

    Windows 2000


    Private properties for Physical Disk Resource 'Disk Q:':

    T Resource Name Value

    -- ----------- ---------------------- --------------------

    D Disk Q: Signature 1415371731 (0x545cdbd3)

    D Disk Q: SkipChkdsk 0 (0x0)

    D Disk Q: ConditionalMount 1 (0x1)

    B Disk Q: DiskInfo 03 00 00 00 ... (264 bytes)

    B Disk Q: MountVolumeInfo D3 DB 5C 54 ... (104 bytes)

    New private properties that are introduced in Windows 2000 are:

    SkipChkdsk

    ConditionalMount

    MountVolumeInfo

    The behavior of Chkdsk depends on the values that are assigned to the SkipChkdsk and ConditionalMount properties. If the disk is found to be corrupted by checking the dirty bit, or, in the case of the quorum disk, if the MSCS folder is inaccessible, Chkdsk behaves as follows on cluster disk resources.

    Table 7

    Registry key

    Description

    SkipChkdsk = 1

    The Cluster service does not run Chkdsk against the dirty drive and mounts the drive for immediate use.

    Note SkipCHKDSK = 1 overrides the ConditionalMount setting, and the Cluster service behaves the same no matter what the ConditionalMount property is set to.

    SkipChkdsk = 0 and ConditionalMount = 0

    The Cluster service puts the disk resource in a failed state and leaves it offline.

    SkipChkdsk = 0 and ConditionalMount = 1

    The Cluster service runs chkdsk /f against the volume that was found to be dirty and then mounts it after it has been repaired. This is the default behavior for Windows 2000 server clusters and the only behavior for Windows NT 4.0 server clusters.

    You can modify these resource private properties by using the following commands:

    cluster cluster_name res “Disk Q:” /priv SkipChkdsk=0[1]

    cluster cluster_name res “Disk Q:” /priv ConditionalMount=0[1]

    Chkdsk Status Codes in the Cluster Log


    When you analyse the Cluster log during a Physical Disk resource’s online process, you may see the following error message:

    FixCorruption: CHKDSK returned status of .

    A message similar to the following example is logged in the Cluster log:

    00000584.000005dc::YYYY/MM/DD-HH:MM:SS.SSS Physical Disk : FixCorruption: CHKDSK returned status of 2.

    The following error codes may be displayed.

    Table 8: Error Codes


    Code

    Meaning

    0

    Success. No errors found.

    1

    Success. Chkdsk has detected and fixed major errors.

    2

    Success. Chkdsk has detected and fixed minor inconsistencies.

    3

    Error. Chkdsk could not finish running.

    3221225786

    Chkdsk was aborted. 3221225786 is C000013A(hex) or STATUS_CONTROL_C_EXIT
    Capturing Chkdsk Results for Server Clusters


    When you bring a Physical Disk resource online and it has the dirty bit set, Chkdsk runs to verify the integrity of the file system. Results are logged in the Application event log, and status codes are logged in the Cluster log. Additionally, in Windows 2000 Service Pack 1 (SP1) and Windows Datacenter Server, the Cluster log also references a log file in which detailed Chkdsk output is recorded.

    Differences in Windows NT 4.0


    On a Windows NT 4.0 server cluster, there is no detailed information saved when Chkdsk runs. The Physical Disk resource may appear to hang or to be in an Online Pending state, with no notification or logging as Chkdsk runs in the background.

    Note Running Chkdsk on a Windows NT 4.0 cluster has a different procedure from running it on a Windows 2000 cluster. For more information, see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:

    176970 “How to Run the CHKDSK /F Command on a Shared Cluster Disk”

    To capture detailed information about Chkdsk, Autochk must run during the start-up process. The Autochk results are logged in the Application event log with the source “AUTOCHK.”



    Note Not all the data may fit in the single Application event log entry; some data may be truncated for post analysis.

    Differences in Windows 2000 Versions Earlier than SP1


    Here are some examples of Chkdsk output for a cluster server that is running a version of Windows 2000 earlier than SP1:

    • Cluster log

    Physical Disk : FixCorruption: Chkdsk returned status of 1

    • System event log

    Event Source: ClusSvc
    Event ID: 1066
    Description: Cluster disk resource : is corrupt. Running Chkdsk /f to repair problems.

    • Application event log

    Event Source: Chkdsk
    Event ID: 26180
    Description:
    Checking file system on S:
    The type of the file system is NTFS.
    Volume label is S_Drive.
    The MFT mirror is different from the MFT.
    Correcting errors in the Master File Table (MFT) mirror.
    Windows has made corrections to the file system.

    528367 KB total disk space.


    15547 KB in 26 files.
    20 KB in 24 indexes.
    0 KB in bad sectors.
    4643 KB in use by the system.
    4096 KB occupied by the log file.
    508157 KB available on disk.

    1024 bytes in each allocation unit.


    528367 total allocation units on disk.
    508157 allocation units available on disk.

    Note For more information about Chkdsk information in Cluster event logs, see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base articles:

    265533 “Explanation of Chkdsk Status Codes in Cluster Log”

    272244 “Location of the Chkdsk Results for Windows Clustering Resources”

    176970 “How to Run the CHKDSK /F Command on a Shared Cluster Disk”

    Differences in Windows 2000 Advanced Server SP1 and Windows 2000 Datacenter Server


    In Windows 2000 Advanced Server SP1 and Windows 2000 Datacenter Server, the Cluster service saves the Chkdsk results to an independent log file. This log file is saved to the %SystemRoot%\Cluster folder, and the name has the following format:

    Chkdsk_Disk#_SigXXXXXXXX.log

    Note This Chkdsk log file represents the last Chkdsk results for that specific disk. For example, if Disk 2 has two partitions and you run Chkdsk against both of them, only the results of the last partition are recorded in the log file.

    This functionality is only provided by the Physical Disk resource type that is provided by Microsoft. Other disk resource types that are provided by third-party vendors may not support this feature.

    The Cluster log displays two messages similar to the following examples:

    00000584.000005dc::YYYY/MM/DD-HH:MM:SS.SSS Physical Disk : DisksOpenChkdskLogFile: Chkdsk output is in file: E:\WINNT\CLUSTER\Chkdsk_Disk3_Sig3252EAA8.log

    00000584.000005dc::YYYY/MM/DD-HH:MM:SS.SSS Physical Disk : FixCorruption: Chkdsk returned status of 2.

    The Chkdsk_Disk#_SigXXXXXXXX.log may display an output similar to the following example.



    Note The type of the file system is NTFS, and the volume label is S_Drive.

    Chkdsk is verifying files (stage 1 of 3)...


    0 percent completed.
    1 percent completed.
    .........
    98 percent completed.
    100 percent completed.
    File verification completed.
    Chkdsk is verifying indexes (stage 2 of 3)...
    0 percent completed.
    1 percent completed.
    .........
    90 percent completed.
    100 percent completed.
    Index verification completed.
    Chkdsk is verifying security descriptors (stage 3 of 3)...
    0 percent completed.
    1 percent completed.
    .........
    98 percent completed.
    100 percent completed.
    Security descriptor verification completed.
    Correcting errors in the Master File Table (MFT) mirror.
    Windows has made corrections to the file system.

    528367 KB total disk space.


    15547 KB in 26 files.
    20 KB in 24 indexes.
    0 KB in bad sectors.
    4643 KB in use by the system.
    4096 KB occupied by the log file.
    508157 KB available on disk.

    1024 bytes in each allocation unit.


    528367 total allocation units on disk.
    508157 allocation units available on disk.
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    Windows 2000 Chkdsk Management

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