• Plug and Play
  • Plug and Play Extensions
  • Windows Vista™ Privacy Statement Last Updated: November 2006 Contents




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    Peer Name Resolution Service


    What this feature does
    Peer Name Resolution Service allows applications and services to register and to look up a remote application or service, and then get the associated IP address to enable communication with each other over the Internet or a network. A Peer Name is a unique set of alphanumeric characters (for example, 25028246da822ce8ba9a8135552e7a1bcaa50db6).

    Information collected, processed or transmitted
    When you publish a Peer Name using the Peer Name Resolution Protocol (PNRP), the Peer Name Resolution Service publishes a hash of your Peer Name and associates it with your IP address. If an application you are running has published a Peer Name, any computer running the Peer Name Resolution Service can look up the published Peer Name to get your IP address, and then connect and communicate with your computer over the Internet or a network.

    Use of information
    PNRP information is used by other computers to locate and communicate directly with your computer, enabling peer-to-peer connectivity for services and applications. The information is registered on a Microsoft server so your computer can communicate with other PNRP clients outside your local subnet over the Internet. This information is periodically overwritten by other PNRP information. Microsoft does not use this information to identify you or contact you.

    Choice and control
    By default, the Peer Name Resolution Service is enabled but does not start running until an application needs to use it. To allow or prevent publishing and resolution of Peer Names from your computer, an administrator can enable or disable the Peer Name Resolution Protocol using Services in Administrative Tools, located under System and Maintenance in Control Panel. However, disabling the service might prevent some features of Windows, such as Windows Meeting Space, from functioning properly. For more information about Administrative Tools, see Windows Help and Support.

    Plug and Play


    What this feature does
    Windows Plug and Play makes it easier to install hardware devices on your computer. When you plug in a Plug and Play device, Windows automatically installs compatible drivers, updates your computer to recognize the device, and allocates the system resources that your computer needs to work with the device. After you install a Plug and Play device, the driver is configured and loaded dynamically whenever you use the device, typically without requiring your input.

    Information collected, processed or transmitted
    When you install a Plug and Play device, the Windows Update client contacts the online Windows Update service to find and download device drivers. The Windows Update client handles all of the communication between the computer and Windows Update. To learn more about the information collected by Windows Update and how it is used, see the Windows Update Privacy Statement at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=50142.

    Use of information
    Plug and Play detects and manages Plug and Play devices, performing tasks such as: determining hardware resource requirements; locating appropriate device drivers; loading and unloading drivers; and, in conjunction with power management, handling stop and start processes for devices. When you install a Plug and Play device, the information that is sent to the online Windows Update service is used to download and install the appropriate device drivers.

    Choice and control
    Plug and Play is enabled by default. To prevent reliability problems, Plug and Play cannot be disabled. However, administrators can determine the search locations for drivers, or prevent users and computers from automatically accessing Windows Update.

    Plug and Play Extensions


    What this feature does
    Plug and Play Extensions (PnP-X) provides the same experience for network-connected devices as Plug and Play does for devices that are connected directly to your computer. In addition, this feature allows your computer to discover and connect to devices on your local network (subnet), and it allows devices that support PnP-X to broadcast their presence on a subnet. After you install a PnP-X enabled device, the driver is configured and loaded dynamically whenever you use the device, typically without requiring your input.

    Information collected, processed or transmitted
    PnP-X enabled devices may advertise their presence on the subnet by broadcasting data, such as the device's IP address and a unique identifier, over the subnet. Be aware that PnP-X supports a wide range of devices, including network drives and devices (such as digital cameras) that could contain personal information. Also, when you install a PnP-X enabled device, the Windows Update client contacts the online Windows Update service to find and download device drivers. The Windows Update client handles all of the communication between the computer and Windows Update. To learn more about the information collected by Windows Update and how it is used, see the Windows Update Privacy Statement at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=50142.

    Use of information
    When you install a PnP-X enabled device, the information that is sent to the online Windows Update service is used to download and install the appropriate device drivers. Information sent over the subnet is used to identify the device and enable access to the features offered by the device.

    Choice and control
    Administrators can determine the search locations for drivers, or prevent users and computers from automatically accessing Windows Update. There is no facility for disabling PnP-X or for controlling which information is sent by a PnP-X enabled device once it is accessed across a network. Before attaching PnP-X enabled devices to your network, we recommend that you verify that your network is secure. For example, if you use a cable modem to connect to the Internet, consider installing a router that isolates your area of the network from that of other users on the network. Or, if you have a wireless network, we recommend that you turn on an authentication service such as Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) or Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA). For more information about helping to secure a wireless network, see Windows Help and Support.
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    Windows Vista™ Privacy Statement Last Updated: November 2006 Contents

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