• The Internet –– opportunity and threat
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    AshcroftInternationalBusinessSchool

    Module Guide

    BD415022S

    Internet Marketing

    Module Leader: Marcus Hanwell



    MODULE GUIDECONTENTS








    Page

    1.

    Contact Details


    3

    2.

    Introduction to the module


    4

    3.

    Learning Outcomes


    6

    4.

    Delivery


    7

    5.

    Assessment


    9

    6.

    Learning Resources


    10

    7.

    Module Definition Form


    11



    1. Contact Details
    Contact details of the Module Leader/Module Tutors and, where appropriate, other key staff
    Module Leader
    Marcus Hanwell

    Room Cos 209-A, Cambridge


    Module Tutor
    Philip Robinson

    Room Cos 301, Cambridge




    Programme Administrator:
    Linda Lawrence

    Room Faculty Office, Room Cos009

    Building Coslett

    Telephone:

    E-mail:

    2. Introduction to the module
    Key words

    Marketing, Internet Marketing, E-Commerce


    Welcome to the elective - Internet Marketing.
    E-commerce is perhaps the most exciting development in business-to-business marketing (b2b), and consumer marketing (b2c), in the last 50 years. In only 5 years the amount of business transacted electronically has developed from minimal to a significant part of transactions – particularly in books, software, music and travel. Given this rate of growth, the future development promises to be even more dramatic and an essential tool without which businesses will wither.
    This module deals with both the Marketing aspects of e-commerce (such as communications, differentiation, delivery strategy) and the information technology aspects (website creation, performance monitoring). Students will be expected to develop a marketing strategy using the internet and a prototype website as the assessment for the module.
    The Internet –– opportunity and threat

    The Internet represents a tremendous opportunity. For customers, it gives a much wider choice of products, services and prices from different suppliers and the means to select and purchase items more readily. For organisations marketing these products and services it gives the opportunity to expand into new markets, offer new services and to compete on a more equal footing with larger businesses. For those working within these organisations it gives the opportunity to develop new skills and to use the Internet to improve the competitiveness of a company.

    At the same time, the Internet gives rise to many threats to organisations. For example, start-up companies such as Amazon (books) (www.amazon.com), Expedia (travel) (www.expedia.com), AutoByTel (cars) (www.autobytel.com) and CDNow! (CDs) (www.cdnow.com) have captured a significant part of their market and struck fear into the existing players in the market. Indeed the phrase ‘‘Amazoning a market sector’’ has become a commonly used expression amongst marketers.



    The Internet –– how to react?

    With the success stories of companies capturing market share together with the rapidly increasing adoption of the Internet by consumers and business buyers has come a fast growing realisation that all organisations must have an effective Internet presence to prosper, or possibly even survive! But, it can also raise some serious commercial questions:

    How is an effective Internet presence achieved in a medium that is alien to most companies? Are existing marketing concepts, theories and models still valid? What is the effect on channel and market structures? How should the Internet be used to support existing business and marketing strategies? How should the web site be structured and designed? How should the site be promoted online and offline? How can the Internet be used to communicate with customers and build loyalty? How can we assess whether we are achieving these objectives?

    The aim of this module is to answer this type of question, so that graduates entering employment and practitioners can help the companies they work for compete successfully using this digital medium in conjunction with existing media.



    The Internet –– skills required?

    To help develop the knowledge and skills for marketers to be able to use the Internet effectively, this module has been created to fulfil the following needs:

    To understand the extent to which the Internet changes existing marketing models, and whether new models and strategies can be applied to exploit the medium effectively.

    Marketing practitioners will need practical Internet marketing skills to market their products effectively. Knowledge of the new jargon such as ‘‘portal’’, ‘‘clickthrough’’, ‘‘cookie’’, ‘‘hits’’, ‘‘page impressions’’, ‘‘digital certificate’’ and effective methods of site design and promotion will be necessary either for direct ‘‘hands-on’’ development of a site or to enable communication with other staff or suppliers who are implementing and maintaining the site.

    Given the rapidly changing market characteristics and best practices of Internet marketing, web based information sources are needed to regularly update knowledge. We will use the workshop sessions to review web sites to evaluate the practical implications of the theoretical content of the lectures.

    This module assumes some existing knowledge of marketing in the student, perhaps developed through experience or by studying introductory modules in marketing fundamentals, marketing communications or buyer behaviour.



    3. Learning Outcomes
    The aim of this module is to provide relevant underpinning knowledge required for you to:

    1. Understand the role of the internet in establishing and maintaining different forms of competitive advantage within a range of key business sectors



    1. Compare, contrast and distinguish critically between traditional marketing communications methods and digital applications such as the internet, e-commerce, and EDI (Electronic Data Interchange)



    1. Propose strategic approaches that businesses can use to exploit the internet and compile a typical internet / e-commerce marketing plan



    1. Construct a corporate website suitable for use in e-commerce applications, with reference to objective definition, graphic design, best practice construction techniques, promotion and maintenance of the site.


    4. Delivery

    The structure and contents of this module

    The module is divided into two parts which covers how the Internet is used for marketing by organisations to help achieve competitive advantage in part one and how to create a website in part two.



    Part 1 - Internet Marketing Strategy (Lectures 1 - 5)

    Part 2 – Creating websites (Lectures 6 - 11)
    Lecture 12 – Workshop and review of topics covered
    Seminar Programme

    Session

    Subject Area

    Advance Reading

    1

    An introduction to Internet marketingreviews the relationship between the Internet and the modern marketing concept, the benefits the Internet can bring to adopters, differences to other media and its impact on different elements of the marketing communications mix.

    Chaffey, Mayers et al

    Ch 1

    2

    Key Internet marketing conceptslooks at elements of the internet environment that impact on an organisation’s internet marketing strategy and the relevance of changes in trading patterns and business models enabled by e-commerce.

    Chaffey, Mayers et al

    Ch 2-3

    3

    Internet marketing strategyconsiders how the Internet strategy can be aligned with business and marketing strategies and describes a generic strategic approach with phases of goal setting, situation review, strategy formulation and resource allocation and monitoring.

    Chaffey, Mayers et al

    Ch 4

    4

    Internet marketing and the marketing mixexamines how the internet can be used to vary the marketing mix

    Chaffey, Mayers et al

    Ch 5

    5

    Relationship marketing using the Internet details the benefits of using the Internet for building and sustaining ‘‘one-to-one’’ relationships with customers and looks at e-mail and web-based personalisation techniques for achieving this.

    Marketing Communicationsassesses the difference in communications characteristics between digital and traditional media, identifies effective methods for online and offline promotion and discusses the importance of integrating online and offline promotion.

    Chaffey, Mayers et al

    Ch 6

    Chaffey, Mayers et al

    Ch 8

    6

    Understanding how the internet works.This will provide students with a simple technical overview of the internet and world-wide web, including evolutionary issues and future possibilities.




    7

    Understanding core technical concepts and design principles.This section covers some the IT resources required and professional design principles. It also includes HTML and introduces the simple concept of iterative development.




    8

    Inserting images and hyperlinksOnce the initial challenge of understanding HTML is mastered, the student can progress to image manipulation, and configuring hyperlinks between pages.




    9

    Defining tables and frames for improved layout and menu design.This session covers the use of frames and tables to set out information neatly and attractively. This relates closely to the creation of menu and navigation systems.




    10

    Programming with simple JavaScript functionsJavaScript remains the most popular client-side scripting tool: some fairly simple programming options that enables an interactive experience by the user.




    11

    Configuring web forms and interactive featuresForms are the classic way that a user can submit information to a web-site for some useful purpose – often via integrated email. This is a basic introduction to the options offered.




    12

    Assignment Review




    5. Assessment
    The assignment for this module will consist of the following:

    1. The development of an e-commerce strategy for a company (this will be a written 2,000 word report)

    2. The development of a prototype website to support recommendations made in the written report

    The assignment will be handed out at the beginning of the module.
    Deadline: Level 4 submission January 3rd, 2012.

    6. Learning Resources
    RECOMMENDED TEXT REFERENCE
    Chaffey, D et al (2009), Internet Marketing: Strategy, Implementation and Practice (4thedition), Financial Times Prentice Hall, ISBN: 027369405-7

    Chaffey D. (2009) E-Business and E-Commerce Management (4th edition), Prentice Hall, ISBN 0273707523

    Gay R., Charlesworth A. and Esen R (2007) Online Marketing a customer-led approach, Oxford University Press SBN 978-0-19-926585-5
    Bickerton P, Bickerton M and Perdesi (2000),Cybermarketing (2nd edition), Butterworth-Heinemann, ISBN: 0750647043
    Bickerton, Bickerton and Simpson-Holley (1998),Cyberstrategy, Butterworth-Heinemann, ISBN: 0750642033
    Chaston, Ian (2000), E-Marketing Strategy,McGraw Hill Publishing Company, ISBN: 007709753X
    De-Kare Silver, Michael (2001), E-Shock the new rules (2nd edition) Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN: 0333946014
    Hanson W A (2000), Principles of Internet Marketing,SouthWesternCollege Publishing, ISBN: 0538875739
    O’Connor J, & Galvin E (2001), Marketing in the Digital Age (2nd edition),Financial Times Prentice Hall.
    Pence James (2001) How to do everything with HTML, McGraw Hill
    Sheth, J N &Eshgi A (2000) Internet Marketing London Harcourt
    Students are encouraged to read real live case study material drawn from the internet, and daily business and news media.

    London London, Katta London - Buyuk Britaniya poytaxti, mamlakatning muhim siyosiy, iqtisodiy va madaniy markazi. Temza daryosining quyi oqimida, Shim. dengizdan 64 km masofada, London havzasi deb ataluvchi tekislikning markaziy qismida joylashgan.
    In particular: The Economist, Fortune Magazine, The Sunday Times – Business Section – Enterprise Network Page, Marketing Business, Marketing Week, Campaign, NET Magazine

    7. Module Definition Form







    Module Definition Form (MDF)



    Module Code: BD415022S

    Version: 3 Date amended: 4th January 2011


    1. Module Title:

    Internet Marketing




    2a. Module Leader:

    2b. Department:

    2c. Faculty:

    Marcus Hanwell

    Human Resources and Marketing

    AIBS




    3a. Level:see guidance notes

    3b. Module Type:see guidance notes

    4

    Standard




    4a. Credits: see guidance notes

    4b. Study Hours: see guidance notes

    15

    150




    5. Restrictions

    Pre-requisites:

    None

    Co-requisites:

    None

    Exclusions:

    None

    Pathways to which this module is restricted:

    None



    LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT INFORMATION (for inclusion in the Module Guide)


    6a. Module Description:200 – 300 words

    E-commerce is perhaps the most exciting development in business-to-business marketing (b2b), and consumer marketing (b2c), in the last 50 years. In only 5 years the amount of business transacted electronically has developed from minimal to a significant part of transactions – particularly in books, software, music and travel. Given this rate of growth, the future development promises to be even more dramatic and an essential tool without which businesses will wither.
    This module deals with both the Marketing aspects of e-commerce (such as communications, differentiation, delivery strategy) and the information technology aspects (website creation, performance monitoring). Students will be expected to develop a marketing strategy using the internet and a prototype website as the assessment for the module.
    One of the main focuses for the design of this module has been the further development of relevant employability and professional skills. Such skills are implicit in the learning outcomes.
    Multiculturalism has been considered during the design of this module and will be considered when the assessment brief is written.

    6b. Outline Content:

    Internet Marketing Fundamentals

    • Introduction to Internet Marketing

    • Key Internet Marketing concepts

    • Development of a knowledge of the practical aspects

    • Finding information on the internet

    Key elements of strategy


    Internet Marketing – Implementation and Practice



    • Creating and building the website

    • Maintaining and managing the website and measuring Internet marketing effectiveness

    • Website promotion

    • Direct marketing techniques

    • Services marketing

    • Electronic commerce transactions

    • Business-to-consumer marketing – B2C

    6c. Key Texts/Literature:

    Key text

    Chaffey, D. (2009) Internet marketing strategy, implementation and practice (4th Edition) Harlow:Prentice Hall.


    Additional Reading/Resources

    Chaffey, D. (2009) E-Business and E-Commerce Management(4th Edition) Harlow:Prentice Hall

    O'Connor, J. and Galvin, E. (2001) Marketing in the Digital Age (2nd Edition) London: FT/Prentice Hall

    Bickerton, P. and Bickerton, M. (1998) Cyberstrategy, Oxford: CIM/Butterworth and Heinemann.

    Stroud, D. (1998) Internet Strategies: a corporate guide to exploiting the InternetLondon: Macmillan Business

    De Kare-Silver, M. (2001) E-Shock: the new rules (2nd edition) AMACOM

    Hanson, W.A. (1999) Principles of Internet marketing, Thompson.

    Sheth, J. N, and Eshgi, A. (2000) Internet Marketing, London: Harcourt.



    The Economist,

    Marketing Week,

    The Sunday Times Business Pages - Enterprise Network Page

    Interactive Marketing (journal)

    Journal of Direct, Data and Digital Marekting Practice.


    6d. Specialist Learning Resources:

    Use of computer rooms for second half of the module (ie 6 week period) to enable students to create website

    7. Learning Outcomes (threshold standards):




    On successful completion of this module the student will be expected to be able to:

    Knowledge and understanding

    1. Understand the role of the internet in establishing and maintaining different forms of competitive advantage within a range of key business sectors

    Intellectual, practical, affective and transferable skills

    1. Compare, contrast and distinguish critically between traditional marketing communications methods and digital applications such as the internet, e-commerce, and EDI (Electronic Data Interchange)

    2. Propose strategic approaches that businesses can use to exploit the internet and compile a typical internet / e-commerce marketing plan

    3. Construct a corporate website suitable for use in e-commerce applications, with reference to objective definition, graphic design, best practice construction techniques, promotion and maintenance of the site.




    8. Learning Activities

    Learning Activities

    Hours

    Learning

    Outcomes

    Additional Comments (including details of use of web-CT)

    Teacher managed learning:

    24

    1-4




    Student managed learning:

    126

    1-4




    TOTAL

    150










    9. Assessment

    Assessment Method

    % contribution to

    module mark or P/F

    Learning

    Outcomes

    Development of an e-commerce strategy for a company – written 2,000 word report

    50%

    1-4

    Development of a prototype website to support recommendations made in written report

    50%

    1-4


    In order to pass this module, students are required to achieve an overall mark of 40%
    In addition, students are required to

    (a) achieve the qualifying mark for each element of fine grade assessment as specified above

    (b) pass any pass/fail elements




    OTHER TECHNICAL DETAILS


    10. Delivery of the Module Please delete as appropriate

    Delivery

    This module is delivered over…

    Yes or No?

    Indicate which by deleting as appropriate

    1

    a single semester

    Y / N

    Semester 1 or

    Semester 2

    2

    two semesters

    Y / N

    Semester 1

    Semester 2

    3

    a single trimester

    Y / N

    Trimester 1

    Trimester 2

    Trimester 3

    4

    two trimesters

    Y / N

    Trimester 1

    Trimester 2

    Trimester 3

    5

    three trimesters

    Y / N

    Trimester 1

    Trimester 2

    Trimester 3

    6

    multiple delivery patterns

    Y / N




    7

    an exceptional delivery pattern

    Y / N







    11. Learning Activities – further details

    Learning Activities

    Details of duration and frequency of learning activities

    Teacher managed learning:

    2 hour class–work sessions per week consisting of lectures and discussions. Some time to be spent in computer rooms in second half of module discussing methods to create a website

    Student managed learning:

    Reading around the subject and preparation of a website to support the report they will write for the first assignment




    12. Module Assessment – further details

    Method

    Length/duration





    Fine graded (FG) or pass/fail (PF)

    Minimum Qualifying Mark

    see guidance notes

    Comments

    Assignment

    2000 words

    FG

    30%

    Written report

    Website

    20 pages (equivalent to 2000 word report

    FG

    30%

    Prototype website



    13. Subject: see guidance notes

    N5 Marketing and Market Research






    Internet Marketing Semester 1 – 2011/12

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